Kantar Health Blog

  • PD-1 Inhibitors Running Neck-and-Neck in Head and Neck

    by Stephanie Hawthorne | Jun 6, 2016
    Stephanie Hawthorne
    Oncology Conference Insight: ASCO 2016 --- Patients with recurrent or metastatic (R/M) head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) who are refractory to platinum-based therapy have a poor prognosis with a median overall survival of six months or less.
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  • VYXEOS scores a 10 over 7+3

    by Stephanie Hawthorne | Jun 4, 2016
    Stephanie Hawthorne
    Oncology Conference Insight: ASCO 2016 --- Therapeutic approaches for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have gone unchanged for several years. Most newly diagnosed patients achieve complete remission (CR) with a combination regimen of cytarabine plus an anthracycline (7+3 most commonly). However, the high rate of CR comes at the cost of a high level of toxicities with this regimen.
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  • Veni, Vedi, Vene? Venetoclax hopes to conquer CLL

    by Stephanie Hawthorne | Dec 8, 2015
    Stephanie Hawthorne
    Oncology Conference Insight --- ASH 2015: Treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has enjoyed somewhat of a renaissance in the past couple of years. Until recently, therapy for both front-line and relapsed disease usually consisted of a Rituxan-based regimen often in combination with chemotherapy agents such as fludarabine or Treanda.
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  • Stephanie Hawthorne
    Oncology Conference Insight: ASH 2015 --- The field of immunotherapy in oncology has exploded in the last few years, particularly in the case of immune checkpoint inhibitors, which block the immune system’s “brakes” by inhibiting either CTLA-4, PD-L1, PD-L2 or PD-1 (although inhibitors of other immune checkpoint molecules are also in early stages of development).
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  • Stephanie Hawthorne
    Oncology Conference Insight: ASH 2015 --- Cytarabine-based intensive chemotherapy remains standard of care for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML); however, about 70% of patients will relapse within five years of initial therapy, thus highlighting the need for development of more efficacious regimens.1 While therapy has traditionally consisted of a “one-size-fits-all” concept, it is better appreciated that AML is a rather heterogeneous disease comprising various subtypes with complex genetic and chromosomal changes.
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