Kantar Health Blog

  • Stephanie Hawthorne
    Although Arzerra is the second most utilized agent in the United States in CLL patients after their second relapse, it is still only used in 14% of U.S. CLL patients. This utilization rate highlights the unmet need for more therapies and helps partly explain the level of excitement for new therapies such as Imbruvica and idelalisib.
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  • Taking a BiTE out of ALL

    by Stephanie Hawthorne | Jun 3, 2014
    Stephanie Hawthorne
    Currently no targeted therapies are approved for the treatment of relapsed/refractory Philadelphia Chromosome-negative (Ph-) acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). Moreover, given the toxicities associated with the available chemotherapy options, less than half of patients are treated with second-line therapy.
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  • Stephanie Hawthorne
    As treatment of lung cancer patients has become more driven by histology and biomarkers, one group of patients had been left out of the clinical advances made in recent years with targeted therapies: non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients whose tumors have squamous histology.
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  • Yervoy paves the way in adjuvant melanoma

    by Stephanie Hawthorne | Jun 3, 2014
    Stephanie Hawthorne
    Yervoy® (ipilimumab, Bristol-Myers Squibb) was an exciting and welcomed breakthrough in the treatment of advanced/metastatic melanoma when it was first launched in 2011. The agent not only improved the median overall survival (OS) in patients irrespective of BRAF status; it also showed a plateau in the survival curve, indicating that a subset of patients derive long-term benefit from Yervoy. Given the poor prognosis of metastatic disease, however, could Yervoy have a greater impact on survival outcomes if used earlier in the course of the disease?
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  • Stephanie Hawthorne
    Both Avastin® (bevacizumab, Genentech/Roche/Chugai) and Erbitux® (cetuximab, Bristol -Myers Squibb/Eli Lilly/Merck KGaA) are approved for the treatment of first-line metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) and have demonstrated progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) benefits when added to standard chemotherapy in these patients. As with all therapies that exist in the same indication, physicians are left wondering how best to incorporate these agents into their practices.
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